A few Web 2.0 Tools for the Classroom

 

A few new Web 2.0 tools which I have come across  which could be of great use in the classroom.

  1. Highlighter App

This simple app can be downloaded from the Chrome Store or the Apple store depending on which device you are using. There is many variations to this app but each have the simple understanding that when you are online or using a device you like to highlight key points or ideas which catch your attention as you are reading. Price depends on what you are looking for; however in general it seems to be free to download and use.

 

2. Second Life

I came across Second Life by chance. However, so far I have been very impressed by it’s concept and ideas. It allows people to create a free 3D virtual world.

When teaching history, it’s important to try and use visuals in the classroom. For example, when teaching the Romans, minecraft has a huge selection of visuals which can be used when teaching about the Roman villa or domus.

However, allowing students to create their own Roman Villa or Domus – or even Roman town would bring topics alive for students. Additionally, this will allow students to bring history alive and into the twenty-first century through this Web 2.0 tool.

3. Answer Garden

Answer Garden is a web 2.0 tool which I have yet to use – yet I have heard very positive things about it from those I know who have used it in a classroom setting.

Answer Garden allows for a teacher or student to a put a question in and press the submit button. The most frequent answers are shown. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Glogster

Glogster  is a new Web 2.0 technology that allows students and teachers to make multimedia posters.

Glogster is an excellent Web 2.0 Technology ties into the NCCA Key Skills as well.

  1. Glogster encourages students to think critically and creatively as they have to create a multimedia poster but use relevant information.
  2. They have to process information to make the multimedia poster.
  3. When making a multimedia poster they have to communicate with their teacher and fellow classmates when making a multimedia poster.
  4. If the teacher uses Glogster in class, students will have to think what they want to do, how they want to create the poster and how much information they want to put on the poster and can they achieve their plan in the limited amount of time they will have.

An example of some Glogster Posters!

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Additionally, it’s great for students as there is already made templates and examples for students full of media which can help them get ideas.

It’s also free and easy for students to use as well as being safe.

For more information on Glogster try looking at Glogster Twitter Page: http://ncca.ie/en/Curriculum_and_Assessment/Post-Primary_Education/Senior_Cycle/Key_Skills/Key_Skills_Framework.html

Storybird

 

 

storybird

 

web2.0

 

Storybird is a Web 2.0 Tool which is an excellent tool for encouraging literacy and creativity in the classroom.


 

In a learning scenario, “starting with pictures” is powerful: it stirs the emotions while it engages the brain and jumpstarts students into their text, avoiding the blank-page syndrome. And it’s effective.

blank page

 

As stated on their website it allows students to overcome blank page syndrome which they can suffer when they feel pressured and overwhelmed when trying to think outside out the box when it comes to essay writing and creative lessons.

 


 

Visual storytelling for everyone.

A platform for writers, readers, and artists of all ages.

As storybird is free to use and an accessible platform for all ages it could encourage students and family to create a story – which allows students families to feel more connected in their students learning.

librarybooks

Also, it allows for communal projects and collaborations between both students and classes. This cross over can led to a library of books which can be sold and published if it’s wished through the paid feature to download and sell a book created. This incentive to allow students work to be sold and publish work can not only build up the students and schools portfolio but raise much needed funds for schools.


 

A massive attraction of Storybird is that it can be used with any devices, whether it be a phone, a tablet, a laptop, a netbook or a school computer.

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One other feature which I would encourage when using storybird is the use of paragraphs. For History and English paragraphs play a huge part in the layout of essays and the overall presentation/impression mark.

 

 

 


 

no collection data

One other feature of storybird which makes it very attractive in a classroom and school setting is due to the simple fact that it’s a private website no data is collected. A rising problem with websites is the collection of data and the risk this poses for users in the future.


 

Also, incase you missed this little bit of information earlier – it is free to use!

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For more on storybird check out these resources!

                                                                                                                    prezi logo https://prezi.com/kmgpwvqpwde7/introduction-to-storybird/

 

Christmas – Animoto style

A web 2.0 educational resource I have yet to delve into yet (plans for the weekend is to curl up with a cup of strong coffee and delve into all these educational resources!) is Animoto!

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What is Animoto?

Animoto is a cloud-based video creation service that produces video from photos, video clips, and music into video slideshows. Animoto is based in New York City with an office in San Francisco. (All credit for TNW

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Sometimes it’s easier to demonstrate something that try and explain it thus keeping with the Christmas Theme let me show you an example of Animoto in action!

 

Want to know more?

http://thenextweb.com/insider/2013/01/14/animoto-celebrates-its-fifth-birthday-with-six-million-users-and-new-i-love-ny-video-style/. This article ran a great article on Animoto fifth birthday which summarised all the questions you may have about animoto!

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Key skills – Being Creative

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One of the key skills on the Junior Certificate is Being Creative.

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The key elements in regards to Being Creative are:

1.  Imagining
2.  Exploring options and alternatives
3.  Implementing ideas and taking action
4.  Learning creatively
5.  Stimulating creativity using digital technology.

Keeping this in mind – I want to look at Web 2.0 tolls which might fit into this theme of Being Creative!

 


 

@PowToon

powtoon

 

1.Imagining

4.Learning creatively

5.Stimulating creativity using digital technology.

 

Powtoon is a creative tool which I think fits this category of the Key Skills perfectly! Though I have only been using @PowToon recently – I find it has allowed be to be very creative and interactive with my lessons.

I have made three Powtoons so far and each has been easy to create and use in the classroom. No ads, no huge long trail, easy demo and best of all engages the students!

So far, it’s been a huge hit with the students as they are amazed that they can create a shirt video and have different elements come in at certain times. (Santa waving has been a huge hit with 1st years)

Additionally, I feel it’s also a great starting point if you are doing multimedia with a class as sometimes they are overwhelmed using Windows moviemakrer and other editing online products.


 

@historyepics

history

These are two web 2.0 tools I would highly encourage use of if trying to embrace the key skills into the classroom if teaching history.

According to the Key skills document:

Photos can be used in language classes, History, Geography, and lots of subjects to develop students’ capacity to imagine what it would be like to be in that moment. You might use historic images of people and events, or current images of people who are experiencing challenges or triumphs and ask students to imagine what they would think, feel and do if they were in the picture. Students might choose a character from a photograph and take on the role. Other class members can then question them in role. Or each group might be given a photo mounted on a large sheet of paper and then write what they think the character in the photo might be thinking and feeling.